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important two-fold purpose. it promotes normal trade relations with russia, and at the same time the legislation insists that the russian government adhere to the rule of law. it does so by putting consequences in place for those in russia who abusive human rights, basic human rights. granting pntr to russia is a big win for americans. if congress does not act, american workers, including millions employed by small businesses, stand to lose out to foreign competitors as russia opens its market as a new member of the world trade organization. many in my home state of mississippi and around the country deserve to benefit from increased trade that this new relationship would bring. more jobs and greater economic growth are our potential rewards here in the united states. last year, mississippi's $55 million in exports to russia helped support an estimated 170 jobs. certainly, this number needs to grow, and i believe it will under this legislation. yet in realizing the immense trade potential at hand, we cannot ignore the urgent need to address serious concerns about russia's appalli
and colombia export agreements. hopefully our bipartisan actions today to boost exports to russia will signal a new chapter, for us to engage as a congress and with the administration in a much more ambitious and proactive trade policy. i'm pleased this bipartisan bill received such broad support from republicans and democrats in the house, getting 365 votes, and i urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to now support this legislation before us. thank you, madam president. i yield the floor. a senator: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan is recognized. mr. levin: madam president, i understand now under the existing unanimous consent agreement that we are going to be proceeding to debate a judge. i would ask unanimous consent that immediately after the disposition of that nomination that i be the first democratic senator recognized when we return to the pending trade bill. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. under the previous order, the senate will proceed to executive session to consider calendar number 676, which the clerk will report.
union and the nato or meant to keep russia out and the germans down now they are triumphant economically. germany may not have the solution to every economic problem but to berlin is the point of arbitration for all of them so the question arises and this goes back to the geography with russia needing the buffer zone in eastern europe remember the collapse didn't indian security facing ray it faced invasions' with will lead vehicle lithuanians, french, german throughout history. so we're back with a regional power flashed with natural gas. a rich and wealthy germany, poland between them that has -- >> it has gas under that many get an energy power in the century. this is living in geography. your argument about russia and russia's in security would be that it's too flat. half the world's longitudes but it's indefensible, it runs north, south so they don't unite the country and had less people than bangladesh. 141 million people, bangladesh has more. so vladimir putin sent up near imperialism on the deepak geographical and security and that's how we should understand not as a madman hour
from russia. my wife abby and i adopted our son charlie from russia a number of years ago now. after visits to russia and as we were leaving the courthouse the day that our -- the court procedures were accomplished, we were in the car with people who had helped us with that adoption who represented an organization here in the united states, in this case the gladney organization in texas, and they got a call that four of their fellow organizations had just been decertified in russia, and they were decertified for some technical reason as their papers regarding all of the adoptions they had done were reviewed, and at least one error was found in one paper somewhere. mr. president, over the course of the next 12 months as every single agency came up -- and this is about six years ago -- as every single agency came up for review, every one of them had a problem that wound up with them being disqualified. at the end of that year, there wasn't a single american organization that could be helpful to an american family with a russian adoption because that was the policy the government decide
. senators continued debate today on normalizing trade relations with russia. a vote expected shortly after noon today. and not to live coverage of the u.s. senate here on c-span2. the chaplain, dr. barry black, will lead the senate in prayer. the chaplain: let us pray. god of wonder, beyond all majesty, you alone are worthy of our praise. stay with us, bringing your grace and gladness to brighten our lives. lord, remove our sins from us and cleanse us with your spirit, emancipating us from fears about what tomorrow may hold. continue to direct the steps of our lawmakers, keeping them from eleventh-hour decisions that bring unintended negative consequences. remind them that the cost of indecision may be much higher than they anticipate. purple them of the things that increase discord, that in unity they may serve you with fanalfulness. we pray in your sacred name. amen. the presiding officer: please join me in reciting the pledge of allegiance to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisib
, russia, has one military outpost anywhere in the world that is not the former soviet union. they've only got one. guess where it is. that's next. twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. challenge that with new olay facial hair removal duo. a two-step process that removes even coarse, stubborn facial hair gently. plenty of gain, without all that pain... with olay. [ male announcer ] can a car be built around a state of mind? ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevrolet. ♪ with a remarkable new interior featuring the available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. this is where sophistic
that this is true, has outposts covering the globe. in contrast, our old cold war adversary, russia, has one military outpost anywhere in the world that is not the former soviet union. they've only got one. guess where it is. that's next. [ heart beating, monitor beeping ] woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart rate increases ] woman #2: but i don't even live near the water. what you don't know about flood insurance may shock you -- including the fact that a preferred risk policy starts as low as $129 a year. for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] al
outposts covering the globe. in contrast, our old cold war adversary, russia, has one military outpost anywhere in the world that is not the former soviet union. they've only got one. guess where it is. that's next. >>> okay. it's october 1973. president richard nixon is up to his neck in the watergate scandal. the scandal that will soon topple his presidency. his vice president is just days away from resigning. the walls are closing in around him. and out of nowhere a crisis breaks out half a world away. >> good evening. it is an all-out war. that's how israeli defense minister moshe dian describes an invasion of the golan heights and the east banks of the suez by syria and egypt. the surprise attacks came early this morning in the air and on the ground. >> surprise attacks. in october 1973, as richard nixon is crumbling beneath the weight of watergate, our ally israel is simultaneously surprise attacked by egypt from the west and by syria from the north. after initially being caught off guard by the attacks, israel eventually takes the upper hand. they are not only able to defend the
aadodop children from russia, but that might come to an end thanks to a acontroversi controversial bill russia's parliament. >>> he's taking a bow. he's getting a second chance at a job he quit five years ago. japan's new prime minister making a stunning comeback. >>> as the sound of gunfire rings out in syrian neighborhoods, the country's military police chief has reported defected to the other side. ng. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. ...but he'd wait for her forever, for any reason, and would always be there with the biggest welcome home. for a love this strong, dawn only feeds him iams. compared to other leading brands, it has 50% more animal protein. ...to help keep rocky's body as strong as a love that never fades... if he ever lets her
this compliance. russia appears to want to limit both the influence of the united states and turkey in the south caucasus, but it is unclear to me whether they also seek to minimize iranian's influence. i have followed with great interest turkey's attempts. and my sense is that such a step holds the greatest potential to improve both stability and prosperity in the region. lifting our means isolation would not only allow for greater independence from iranian and russian influence, it would also be mutually beneficial for turkey and her meaning and a number of ways. i'm interested in hearing the panels perspectives on whether this is an issue that turkish and a meaning governments might be able to reengage in. but we can all agree on is this, as i conclude, is that it is in no one's interest to see a nuclear-armed iran. and i look forward to exploring how the south caucasus region and help the united states and europe prevent this outcome. we cannot have that as an outcome. i anxiously await hearing the testimony of our witnesses, again, mr. chairman, it's been a pleasure and i think that this he
for peace talks as the violence escalates. the country's ally, russia, is inviting the leader of syria's opposition to visit moskow for the first time but that offer turned down. some interesting developments here. let's get them from leland vittert live in our mideast bureau. leland? >> reporter: jon, no one really views russia as an honest broker here especially the rebels who for so long seen russia side with pat assad in this conflict. they don't really want to deal with the russians, hence turning down the invitation. the rebels now think time is on their side. the momentum is on the battlefield has shifted. for so long the rebels were outgunned and outmaneuvered. they hold major parts of northern part of the syria and major population centers in the center of the country that president assad up till now had control. one rebel fighter said we'll fight all the way to president assad's palace. the rebels don't see a reason to negotiate while president assad is in power. the while the offer from the russians may not be so significant is the fact they're making it is significant. russ
rebel fighters say they captured a military base. russia's foreign minister says he received guarantees from president assad he will not use chemical weapons against rebels. >> i met president assad and we exchanged views on the next steps that can be taken to move forward. the president spoke of his viewpoint and i told of what i gathered from my many meetings i of that indifference cities and with various officials in the region and outside the region. we also discussed the steps i see it can be taken to help the syrian people come out of the crisis. the situation in syria remains of high concern and with the party's move of the direction of a solution that the people of this -- of syria aspire to. >> let's be to our correspondent on the border between turkey and syria. as you say, this is brahimi's third trip and the situation has gotten significantly worse since the last time. are we any further forward this time? >> we do not have the details of the meeting, in a sense we did not know exactly what ideas brahimi presented to the syrian president bashar al-assad. he said we discussed
stakeholders' liked iran and russia. >>thank you for your answers. i'm looking for something a little bit more specific. what is the relation between the new coalition and the military council? do you think they can become an administrative body for the revolution or a government in exile as you just described? >> is there a follow-up question? >> the new coalition actually put three things they have to do. the first to form a new government and to form a military council, and in the third thing the to play a role in the humanitarian assistance or humanitarian aid. the debate right now within the new coalition, are we able to form a government until we get it in guarantees from the international community, suc. restated three examples before of government in exile. if there is no recognition of the international community, there is nothing the government in exile can do. the second thing is the financial assistance. i said before, after the formation of the serbian national council, six months we don't have what we need to do. you cannot work as a workin exile with individual budgets. the rela
has denied any intention of using chemical weapons. russia, a key syrian ally, dismissed the intelligence reports as rumors. yesterday in istanbul, russian president vladimir putin said he understands turkey's concerns about border security, but he warned that deploying patriot missiles could raise fears of a wider conflict. meanwhile, inside syria intense fighting flared again near damascus today. amateur video showed government warplanes carrying out new arrayeds. the syrian capital has seen escalating violence in the last week as rebels try to close the noose on president bashar al assad's regime and the military tries to recapture lost ground. amid the fighting, the state news agency reported that rebel more tar fire killed nine students and a teacher at a school outside damascus today. the opposition also reported the incident but did not say who fired the mortar. meanwhile, there are meanwhile, there are indications that russia's position on syria may be changing. the "new york times" reports that the russians had agreed to a new strategy to persuade president assad
now mr. vitaly churkin. he is russia's ambassador to the united nations. thank you for joining us. let me begin by asking you about the comment today made by your deputy foreign minister mr. bog don november. he said today "it is impossible to exclude a victory of the syrian opposition." how would you describe the situation in syria? >> well, you know i think he went on saying that the syrian government seems to be losing ground in the fighting with the opposition and i think this is obvious. but i don't think there is anything in that statement which one can welcome or not welcome. first of all, that doesn't mean that the trouble will end any time soon. the fighting may continue for a very long time still and the battle may keep going this way or the other way for a long time because you will recall when the crisis started the predictions were that it will last for two to four months and president assad is going to be toppled but that did not happen. another important thing to remember is that even if the current stage of the crisis were to end in the so-called victory of the oppositi
" tonight, we interview russia's ambassador to the united nations, vitaly churkin about syria and about u.s. ambassador susan rice's decision to take her name out of consideration to be secretary of state. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the fiscal crisis here at home. andrew kohut explains the latest poll numbers, showing strong support for the way president obama is handling the negotiations. >> warner: plus, ray suarez gets two views on proposals to raise the age of eligibility for medicare to 67, from 65. >> woodruff: it's bottoms up tonight for miles o'brien who reports on genetic links to alcoholism and other addictions. >> so far as i know, there's no law against reporting under the influence, so here goes something. while i may carry the genes of an irish pub crawler, my chances of becoming an alcoholic are slightly less. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc grossman about prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major fundi
to strike anywhere. now, russia says syria is taking steps to keep them safe. mohammed joins me from beirut. what exactly is syria doing. >> good morning, ra ndi. >> he says that syria has started moving its chemical weapons from various sites across the country and consolidated into one site. safe guard these weapons and make sure they don't fall in the hands of the wrong people. there were a lot of concern about this over the last few months. russia is taking this syria and trying to make sure these weapons don't fall into the wrong hands. the u.s. administration, as well as many other countries said for the last few weeks and the last few months if syria used chemical weapons that would be a red line and suffer severe consequences because of it, randi. >> are the weapons still a threat to the rebels? >> well, the rebels maintain that the weapons are a threat to them and a threat to the general population to syria. they said that they believe assad and his regime would result to utilizing those weapons. we should add, though, that the regime said on many occasions that they don't have che
is watching very closely. >> secretary clinton, in fact, just wrapped up an important meeting in russia, syria's strongest ally. "time" magazine's jim frederick will join us live about the latest developments. we know president obama and speaker boehner spoke on the phone last night, talked a lot about that even though we don't know what they discussed. the first read team says a fiscal cliff deal is in sight. what do they think the big deal will be? join our conversation on twitter. find us at @tamronhall a and @newsnation. [ male announcer ] at scottrade, you won't just find us online, you'll also find us in person, with dedicated support teams at over 500 branches nationwide. so when you call or visit, you can ask for a name you know. because personal service starts with a real person. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our support teams are nearby, ready to help. it's no wonder so many investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. [ man thinking ] oh, this gas. those antacids aren't working. oh no, not that, not here! [ male announcer ] antacids don't re
receives 40% of its natural gas from russia. german investment and technology will be playing a key role in the project. >> it is a victory for russian president vladimir putin. they looked on as the first segments were welded together in western siberia. it is three weeks since bulgaria gave the go-ahead for the project. the last transit country to do so. >> this project has the political support of all partner countries. all have signed the contracts and taken their investment decisions. the pipeline will move huge amounts of gas. 63 billion cubic meters. >> that is how much gas sell stream is to move once it is completed by 2019. it is being routed from the black sea to italy and bypasses the current transit country, ukraine. moscow has argued with kiev over fees and gas prices for years. a feud that has often cut off gas supplies to western europe. >> south stream could soon make ukraine much more willing to compromise. kiev could even agree to some form of russian involvement in its pipeline system and its modernization. >> the launch of south stream gives it a head start. and this
think -- we know we're on the side of right. there's one big ondestruction, and that is russia. russia is a series of clients of russia's, putin has said, you guys, you americans, you can't be sank moneyus about how people live their lives. you want everybody to be like the united states. okay. you saw what happens when you try to foment democracy in places that aren't ready for it. we're here to tell you that if you try to upend assad, even if he is going to ethwe'll go out of business -- >> on his own accord. >> on his own, if you try to do that, you won't like the result, and we are reluktant to go do something that's not going to have a positive effect. we're listening to what putin said. he makes some sense for once. >> colonel jab jacobs. jack, as always, good to see you, sir. >> thanks for having me on the program. >> starting at midnight on saturday, gay and lesbian couple wills faebl be able to legally get married in this country. maine becoming one of nine states to legalize marriage equality when voters approved a ballot initiative in november, but the state by state legisla
with its own people never had many allies to begin with. today russia's support of syria is cracking. for the first time a senior russian official has says publicly syria could likely fall to the rebels. the deputy foreign minister in moscow said we need to look at the facts in the eye. we can't exclude a victory by the opposition. the russians have blocked all u.n. security council resolutions aimed at stopping the civil war in syria. they have vetoed sanctions against the assad regime and provided weapons to government troops fighting the rebels. now their most powerful ally says assad might be losing. they're not alone. head of nato today said this. irng the regime in damascus is approaching collapse. i think now it is only a question of time. but those people, they're the politicians, want to see the real side of syria's civil war, the streets where people are caught up in the crossfire dying there. what you're about to say you can only see here on cnn. this is a teenager risking his life to save a stranger. here's arwa damon. >> reporter: a fighter slithering across the street,
're looking at how to prevent something like this from happening again. >>> russia is trying to put the brakes on americans adopting russian children. and today that ban is one step closer to becoming law. d details are next. it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ trees will talk to networks will talk to scientists about climate change. cars will talk to road sensors will talk to stoplights about traffic efficiency. the ambulance will talk to patient records will talk to doctors about saving lives. it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. the next big thing? we're going to wake the world up. ♪ and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. ♪ cisco. tomorrow starts here. starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. your doctor will say get smart about your weight. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb s
comes from the official scene right here beside syrian president assad. this is russia's deputy foreign minster. he told his country's state run news service the syrian government is losing control of more of the country. a quote from him. "we need to look at the facts in the eye. unfortunately we can't exclude a victory by the opposition." russia was one of the votes that kept the united nations from acting against assad. on top of that, today the native secretary general said this. >> i think the regime in damascus is approaching collapse. i think now is only a question of time. >> another possible sign of assad's regime cracking. four scud missiles that officials say were aimed at anti-government faxes in northern syria. scud missiles here. analysts say the regime they are using reckless extremes it's a sign of desperation. we will talk about that at the top of the hour, but today 28 syrians were killed according to opposition groups. nearly all died in two car bombings in the damascus superbs. >>> a warning, your bank account could come under attack from cyber criminals. this coming
saws russia because they grow during the war and the soviet union, don't forget the arm themselves across the mountains and we make themselves. it's an extraordinary story. migration and reconstruction and dedication of the people and of the losses of the soviets with this 22 or 27 million the stalin's it doesn't matter they plunged into this thing and it was a crucible for them at the war. but the british churchill has a fascinating overlay on this because he has a different motive it seems. once the british islands are saved in the battle of britain his goal seems to be truly to regain the empire. he said i do not mean to dismember the british empire. and the whole -- the whole concept of going to north africa, sending troops into the southern belly of the nazi empire, italy and the balkans, regaining greece which is a tremendous story. everyone talks about eastern europe. as an outsider i see what about the british when they went back into greece in 1944 and started bombing the streets of athens and killing the people, the communist resistors that fought against the nazis. the b
countries in having a pyrotechnics display. australia, china and russia are well into 2013. we are tracking the celebrations. >> residents in samoa were among the first to welcome 2013. these to be the last but a year ago, they jumped to the west of the international dateline. the spectacular start to the new year came in sydney harbour, launched by the australian superstar, kiley been no good. -- kylie minogue. 7 tons of fireworks filled the air above sydney harbour bridge. this city's style is rather different. john yang has held what for help -- it's believed to be the first public new year celebration in north korea. burma has joined the global party. ♪ >> the end of the year would not be complete without the viral pop hit, "gangnam style" being performed with great enthusiasm. while hong kong celebrate with a virtuous so show over victoria harbor. fireworks lit up moscow's red square. in dubai, they filmed the midnight moment under the world's tallest building. the gulf states is eager to take its place among the world's best known venues for the dawn of the new year. >> no happy ne
children were shot and killed by gunman adam lanza that day. russia playing politics. putting their kids at risk. their orphans at risk. president vladimir putin has banned americans from adopting russian children. the move reportedly is in response to human rights violations handed down by president obama earlier this year -- earlier this month rather. putin's new law destroying the dreams of many american families currently in the process of adopting, including this. >> they were already our family. we already had their names. we were already decorating their room. it's really. [crying] >> are you crying? it? >> is so disturbing, this story. 1,000 russian children were adopted by americans last year. children are disabled. not wanted by anybody else in russia. living in orphanages. not available for adoption. a the love these families have gotten really close to the adoption. set everything up and can't go pick up the kids. horrible. anyway, a maryland pizza delivery man fights off a group of attackers. his reward? a demotion. >> he sucker punched me. my glasses flew off. i dropped the
of syria's sophisticated weapons are from russia, syria's most powerful ally. but today, they were so alarmed about the chemical threat, they met with hillary clinton to talk about a possible future for syria without assad. >> we have been trying hard to work with russia to stop the bloodshed, and start a transition towards a post-assad future. >> reporter: the u.s. critics want the administration to consider military options. >> we do know absolutely that these weapons have been readied for use by bashar al-assad's aircraft. again, i urge, we urge the president of the united states to make whatever military preparations are necessary. >> reporter: another military imperative, securing the weapons if assad loses control. >> it is absolutely important that terrorist groups not obtain possession of those weapons, and then try to use them against any other country or any other group within syria. >> reporter: there are military operations, but privately, the u.s. military officials concede that the pre-emptive strike could be risky and could even spread the deadly sarin gas, if he were t
relationship with russia. i think it was a vote on my behalf and others to say we would like a better relationship with the russian people and the russian government. this is an opportunity for russia to show that that vote was juft, this is an opportunity to show the international community at large you can be a constructive force at a time of great need and you have the capability to do some good. i find it ironic and red lines are talked about, but the red line here is literally red. the line we're crossing is 40,000 people have died. what bothers me is the most we are all fixated on the method of killing, not the killing itself. for over a year, we have been talking about getting involved and need to stop this before it gets out of hand. we want to shape what happens after assad leaves. it will be hard to go to the syrian people when they achieve their freedom and say we would like to help you and they will say, you did little at a time in our debatest need. we have a chance to correct that impression. from an american national security point of view, if we don't secure these chem
, with russia and china, containment when it came to russia was countering their expansive capabilities. >> rose: right. >> our own -- when it came to their nuclear capability we were talking about deterrence. >> rose: right. >> and so i think first we want to contain iranian influence in the region, but i think the question that people are -- that what the president is really addressing is, or would we be content with deterrence? >> right. >> and there i think the difference in the ayatollahs and their religious, their they cratic approach to the world, their threats to destroy israel make them a more worrisome, significantly more worrisome possess sorry of nuclear weapons than other nuclear states. >> rose: because they have a different decision al type structure. >> yes. >> rose: from russia, and the soviet union from going into europe once again, deterrence is mutually assured destruction. and so then, does the question of value and life, different because of a culture that can produce suicide bombers mean that there -- means that will not work in the end or do you say no nationable and the
clinton holds emergency talks with russia as u.s. officials confirm reports that the syrian military is prepared to launch chemical weapons against its own people. >> we've made it very clear what our position is with respect to chemical weapons and i think we will discuss that and many other aspects. >> the whole world is watching. the whole world is watching very closely. and the president of the united states has made very clear that there will be consequences. >> plus, sharp criticism from afghan president karzai. the exclusive nbc interview. why he says the u.s. is partly to blame for the growing instability in his country. >>> and the duchess of cambridge leaves the hospital after being treated for acute morning sickness. her royal father-in-law couldn't be happier. >> i'm not a radio station? >> grandfather, that's splendid. that's great she's getting better. >> good day, i'm chris cillizza in for andrea mitchell live in washington. behind the bluster and the rhetoric, what happens going on behind the scenes in the budget negotiations? and big breaking news in this town. senat
charged with attempted espy naj tonight. the alleged benefactor was russia. the war on drugs? have we lost it? let's go "outfront." good evening. a bright idea brought to us by the liberal former governor of vermont, howard dean. the man who brought us the scream heard round the world when he ran for president. yeah! >> dean says let's face it, america. taxes need to go up for everyone. now, this might not be what you expect from someone like howard dean. it's certainly not the president's position or the position of most americans. another new poll out today shows most people like the president's ideas of only raising taxes on other people, specifically the top 2%. individuals making over $200,000 a year or families making over $250,000 a year. the problem is according to the congressional research service, the math doesn't add up. that tax hike would give $678 billion in additional revenue over ten years. remember, we're $16 trillion in the debt hole. if we go with howard dean's idea, we have $2.8 trillion for 17% of the debt. adam davidson is the co-founder of npr's planet money, and he
the british empire. we are cutting power, so does russia because they grow during the war. they arm themselves and remake themselves. it's an extraordinary story. migration and deconstruction and the losses of the soviets, whether it's 22 or 20 million, doesn't matter. the idea of the whole nation plunged into this thing. it was a crucible for them. a great war. but the british -- churchill has a different motive. once the british islands are saved by the -- in the battle of britain, is goal seems to be to regain the empire. he said i did not become prime minister to dismember the british empire, and the whole consent of going into north africa, sending troops to the belly of the nazi empire, regaining greece, which is a tremendous story -- everyone talks about eastern europe. what bet the british when they went back into greece in 1944 and started dive-bombing the streets of athen and killing'm residents who fought against the nazis and that's never pointed out. look at what stalin did in poland. he broke this and that. i don't believe he broke yalta. look what the british did. no one ever po
the united states, from russia and japan all to honolulu where we had simulated a tsunami disaster. and these three great nations brought their fleets to honolulu exercising how to respond and alleviate that disaster. well, that was then. how about now? last year the united states released a new security strategy. most of you probably have not even heard of that, but i have to tell you this was a big deal. it was one of the fifth american security strategies that we have issued since the civil war. among the highlights of that security strategy was a strong statement that the united states had the highest economic and security interests in the asia pacific region. not in europe as has been for 100 years prior to that, than the asia pacific region. secondly, that we would maintain freedom of access throughout that region. in particular, we would maintain the sea lanes in that area, whatever the challenge might be. even as we reduce our defense budget, therefore we must maintain and would maintain a powerful navy, and that that navy would be charged with maintaining the freedom of th
over internet use and content. the changes were supported by 89 countries including russia, china, and saudi arabia. >> coming up, as egypt prepares to vote, why is the new constitution so divisive? we will talk about that. >> the fate of children in afghanistan as nato troops prepare to withdraw. >> stay with us. >> welcome back, everyone. each faces a tense weekend. voting begins on a controversial constitution supported by president mohamed morsi. it has deeply divided the country. >> opposition groups are urging supporters to vote against it. morsi oppose the muslim brotherhood is calling on egyptians to support the document. -- morsi's muslim brotherhood is calling the egyptians to support the document. >> opponents said the document does not do enough to protect women and minorities. the leading activist has asked egypt's president to delay the referendum. >> it is shaping up to be a pivotal moment for the country which has witnessed daily violence in the run-up to the referendum. >> we want to get a closer look at some of the most disputed articles of the new constitution.
through. a blizzard. we are seeing very cold conditions across many parts of russia down through to the ukraine and poland as well. snow and ice is already on the ground and causing quite a few problems with the driving as well. for many of us in the eastern parts of europe, it will stay very cold but the system over the southeastern parts will be spinning around and also giving heavy showers across parts of libya down through egypt as well. for the western parts of northern africa, mostly fine and subtle. not a great deal of problems with the weather. to the east, some of the showers could turn out rather strong. but whether it can also be making its way further to the east, too. already plenty of heavy downpours -- and more heading through thursday. all of it pushing steadily toward the east. kuwait will likely to see clouds and just a chance of thunderstorms. of the people in these camps have fled violence or poverty elsewhere in the country. the government has no where to put them. and elsewhere across afghanistan, aid groups are trying to distribute emergency supplies to the
the craft about two days to reach the iss. vulcanologists in russia have been able to get a glimpse of a spectacular eruption in siberia. it began erupting in late november. >> huge areas of the surrounding tundra and wildlife have been destroyed by the lava stream. it is pouring out thousands of tons of law every second. the volcano last erupted in the 1970's in one is -- in what is one of the world's most volcanic regions. >> stay with us. you are watching the "journal" coming to you from dw in berlin. after a short break, we look at how more and more journalists are coming under harms way than ever before. >> welcome back. every so often, we are reminded that journalism can be a dangerous occupation. reporters without borders says 2012 was the deadliest year for journalists since it began collecting statistics in 1995. >> a few days ago, a high- profile reporter from u.s. tv station nbc escaped death when he broke free from his kidnappers in syria, but many journalists have not been so lucky. >> the civil war in syria has made it the world's most dangerous place for journalists.
for russia's weapons that were made for were times that anybody can get. >> i think all that is true. i do think the change in the commitment laws over the last 30 or 40 years has made it very difficult to compel someone to get treatment or be detained in a mental institution. these killers, is not as if there is a lack of funds for treatment. it is the lack of the ability of a parent would obviously have been a child, to go through the legal loopholes, is such that it is almost impossible. you end up with the tucson shooter who everyone spoke about. they had a sense he was psychotic. on guns, the problem is this. unless you are willing to completely disarm the population, as you do in canada or britain or australia did in the 1990's, and that it works and you have a decrease in gun crimes, if you allow grandfather of existing weapons, as would happen with the 1994 assault weapons law, at which time there were 25 million of the high- capacity magazines already in circulation, you do not accomplish anything. the studies of the 10-year experiment with the ban on assault weapons in the 1990's
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